Ninja

excerpted from this article (see link)

Imagining guys running around in black pajamas and swords, disappearing in a puff of smoke? Well let’s start with a proper… non Hollywood idea of what the Ninja were… or are… and then see what we can learn from them.

Today we have this image of the Ninja as evil assassins sneaking around Japanese castles and killing under cover of night. What most people don’t know is that the Ninja were simple farmers, priests and shopkeepers who were forced out of Japanese society and hunted by their own government. They were the ultimate survivors. In fact the word Ninja in old fashioned Japanese translates to “the person who overcomes”.

Early in Japanese history a Samurai General named Daisuke Togakure lost a battle; and as was tradition in Japan his master ordered him to kill himself and ordered that his family be stripped of all title and land. Instead this Samurai General chose to survive. He fled his home with his family and went to live in the wilderness. Now an outcast being hunted by his own government he was forced to re-invent his understanding of combat. Togakure met up with some Chinese immigrants who had fled the massive wars going on in China. Their knowledge of battle tactics, medicine and technology from all over the Asian main continent helped Togakure form what would become one of the earliest and oldest traditions of the Ninja. (This is just a rough and quick version of the oral history of the founding if this tradition) There are many other traditions of Ninjutsu but they all are similar in that they contain a philosophy of life which values surviving and overcoming or “persevering” and which leads to a simple life style with a very alternative method of self defense. The philosophy of the Ninja stood in opposition of the Bushido code of the Samurai which contained a strong class structure, and espoused suicide as a noble and honorable ideal. To the Samurai the Ninja were dishonorable, evil creatures who had no right to live… the Ninja just wanted to be left alone to live their lives as they saw fit. [ ]

As a person who has studied and practiced this tradition for several years now I have found some great principles which are a guide I use in life and in my preparations to continue life. In all of my training and all of my study of the Ninja culture as it existed hundreds of years ago and as it exists today I have found five principles that seem to apply to the Ninjas secret to not only survive but to thrive. [ ]

Principle #1: Strong and clean spirit
[ ]  The Ninja speak of attaining an unfettered mind; that you should know who you are at your deepest core. Life should be spent learning, knowing and practicing what you are. This done in everyday life gives an unfettered mind and leads to good decision making under even the worst situations. [ ]

Principle #2: Utility.
While the Samurai prided themselves on beautiful swords passed down through their family for generations and body armor decorated with family crests and religious icons the Ninja often used little more than modified farming implements as weapons. This was in part because of the ban on civilians owning or carrying swords… (we can learn a lesson here) but also because of the principle of utility. To the Ninja they were not mere weapons, but rather everything was a tool. A Ninja didn’t pride himself on a fancy sword; instead he would make a sword which like all of his tools served more than one purpose. His other commonly used weapons were converted farming implements. [ ]  Sure the Ninja would have never turned down a fancy ray skin and ivory Katana, but he would usually be found with a much cruder instrument. [ ]

Principle #3: Simplicity.
As I said earlier the Ninja were mostly farmers and merchants, but they could be found in all levels and aspects of life. There were even some Ninja amongst the ruling class of Japan at one time. What was common amongst them was that they strove to live a simple life. Both historic and modern Ninja rarely had lavish homes or castles. Rarely were known to frequent parties and social events. Instead they lived simple lives enjoying the things in life which were of true value. Simplicity permeated all aspect of their life. Often a diet of simple, healthy home grown food was eaten. With this simplicity in lifestyle one also becomes more in tuned to your own environment, able to notice small changes in weather and even understand nature on a closer level. Rarely did the Ninja draw attention to themselves. Instead of going off to become famous warriors and have grand adventures most Ninja lived quiet lives in their villages and trained diligently in their fighting arts; not for glory, but simply as a means to protect them and their families from the outside world. [ ]

Principle #4: Community and Self-Reliance.
Contrary to what some may argue community and self reliance are not mutually exclusive ideas. The Ninja were experts at having a community OF self reliance. The Ninja often lived in very close nit villages and towns where they worked and trained together so as to provide everything they needed and thus insulate themselves from the rest of Japan. [ ]

Principle #5: Fluidity.
Absolutely essential to the fighting style and even day to day life of the Ninja is the principle of fluidity. The Ninja fighting style involves five principle ways or feelings of combat. Each one represents an element of existence and grants almost a personality to your movement and technique. Examples are fire, a strong hot burst of energy cutting through an opponent or earth, the stable and immovable feeling of power. The five elements (earth, wind, fire, water, and the void) are not in themselves all powerful; it is the Ninjas ability to transition from one to the other and combine them in response to any situation which is essential. This fluidity was not just expressed in the elemental forms of combat, but instead is the fundamental difference between the Samurai and the Ninja. The Samurai followed set in stone techniques and movements. Memorize enough movements and you will have one for every situation. The Ninja started when they had to adapt and abandon old ways; this flexibility allowed them to meet all situations and adapt their techniques to any situation. A fundamental idea in the Ninja philosophy is not to have expectations of what will happen, but instead to be ready for and deal with whatever comes. Work towards your goals but adapt to the outcomes as they happen, don’t get caught in a frustrating loop of things not going your way and reacting with the same effort every time. [ ]  We should have basic tools which will work in any situation. Tools which serve multiple purposes and can be adapted to anything we need.  [ ]

WATER: Just as water feeds life and contains a power in both its ability to draw away from and crash back onto anything, to slowly erode a mountain, feed the tallest tree; we need the essentials of life. [ ]

EARTH: Strong foundations in faith and community allow us to stand like a rock against the corruption and destruction around us. [ ]

FIRE: Fire is our arms, our brute force through firepower.
[ ]  The Ninja as with all people of Japan were disarmed by the ruling elites, however the Ninja refused to comply, instead they fought back. [ ]  Fire comes in a burst of violence, heat and action. It is emotional, but not un-controlled. Fire also represents our passion, the passion which makes us act. It is the burning sense of right and wrong which protects our very soul from the corruption of the world. [ ]

WIND: Wind leaves us aloof, it represents the lighthearted sense of security preparedness gives us. [ ]  The feeling of being un-touchable effects your very movement and every aspect of life. Being self reliant, with your own business and self sustaining property gives you this confidence and allows you to take stands politically and economically without fear of losing your job or being evicted from your home if you oppose the powers at be.

THE VOID: This is often a difficult concept. [ ]  The void is the sense that anything can and will happen. On one hand it is the knowledge of all potential dangers and the ability to handle them. On the other hand it is the ability to react with anything, having every tool in your toolbox so that you can react and adapt in any way necessary. [ ]  Where the void can help is in the idea of not being an idea. Not being anything in particular, be void of form. Don’t fit a stereotype . . . . [ ]


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Santa Monica Farmers Market

article

“This is our go-to guy for squashes and root vegetables,” McCarty said, pausing at Weiser Family Farms’ booth. “They’ve got watermelon radishes and 20 kinds of fingerling potatoes. He’s the most educated, informed provider here.”

McCarty noted how the weather truly dictates when and how he changes his menu (something he does every 90 days to reflect the best from the market). Local farmers rule, and Harry’s Berries from Oxnard really are flavorful even in February, we learn.

“Oxnard is one of the best areas in the world for growing winter lettuces and they’re not killing the soil to do it,” he said. “Another area is in Iraq right between the Tigris and Euphrates. Saddam Hussein destroyed it all, but when it comes back, look out.”

McCarty continued to point out further “go-to guys” for his kitchen: McGrath Family Farms with their “inventive” pea tendrils and green mustard frills, Trevino’s rhubarb (“Year round!” Mc Carty marveled. “How does he do it?”), Coleman’s Family Farm’s greens, and citrus from Polito Family Farms.

Thoreau @ Walden

see the full article

Many people remember the book Walden as the story of a hermit living in a hut who survived on twigs and berries in the Concord, Massachusetts woods. Its author, Henry David Thoreau, was no hermit, but a survivalist and philosopher who personified the best of American values of self-reliance, simplicity, love of the land, individualism and defense of personal liberty against governmental overreaching.

He lived simply on Walden Pond from 1845-1847 without a GPS, iPod, iPhone, laptop or wi-fi.

[ ] Thoreau’s principles are an overarching everyday strategy, holding that a life worth living depends upon remaining free and independent, living as autonomous men and women alert and able to confront, ignore, or go around obstacles in our way. [ ]

[ ]  Today few of us could replicate Thoreau’s life in a 10 x 15 foot cabin a mile from his closest neighbor. What we can do whether we live in New York City, Los Angeles, or in between is to think of Walden as a state of mind.

Walden’s principles and maxims are as relevant in 2012 as in 1853. In fact, times were remarkably similar to our world today. Global competition was common. Better quality German pencils nearly drove the Thoreau family pencil business under. The Panic of 1837 was as severe as our financial downturn today. A real estate bubble burst due to sub-prime lending, and real estate prices plummeted. Families lost jobs, spending power, and risked their savings as half the banks in America folded within weeks. The federal government, whose policies touched off the contagion, was growing in power and would continue piling on public debt. Even then, the U.S. government depended upon foreign countries to finance its operations.

As the nation entered the industrial revolution, Walden was Thoreau’s challenge to a society forgetting cultural values and practices of the first Americans such as self- reliance, thrift, and the importance of the family.  [ ]

Stocking the Pantry

here

Oils, Vinegars & Condiments

  • Extra-virgin olive oil for cooking and salad dressings
  • Canola oil for cooking and baking
  • Flavorful nut and seed oils for salad dressings and stir-fry seasonings: toasted sesame oil, walnut oil
  • Butter, preferably unsalted. Store in the freezer if you use infrequently.
  • Reduced-fat mayonnaise
  • Vinegars: balsamic, red-wine, white-wine, rice (or rice-wine), apple cider
  • Asian condiments and flavorings: reduced-sodium soy sauce, fish sauce, hoisin sauce, mirin, oyster sauce, chile-garlic sauce, curry paste
  • Kalamata olives, green olives
  • Dijon mustard
  • Capers
  • Ketchup
  • Barbecue sauce
  • Worcestershire sauce

Seasonings

  • Kosher salt, coarse sea salt, fine salt
  • Black peppercorns
  • Onions
  • Fresh garlic
  • Fresh ginger
  • Anchovies or anchovy paste for flavoring pasta sauces and salad dressings
  • Dried herbs: bay leaves, dill, crumbled dried sage, dried thyme leaves, oregano, tarragon, Italian seasoning blend
  • Spices: allspice (whole berries or ground), caraway seeds, chili powder, cinnamon sticks, ground cinnamon,coriander seeds, cumin seeds, ground cumin, curry powder, ground ginger, dry mustard, nutmeg, paprika, cayenne pepper, crushed red pepper, turmeric
  • Lemons, limes, oranges. The zest is as valuable as the juice. Organic fruit is recommended when you use a lot of zest.
  • Granulated sugar
  • Brown sugar
  • Honey
  • Pure maple syrup
  • Unsweetened cocoa powder, natural and/or Dutch-processed
  • Bittersweet chocolate, semisweet chocolate chips

Canned Goods & Bottled Items

  • Canned tomatoes, tomato paste
  • Reduced-sodium chicken broth, beef broth and/or vegetable broth
  • Clam juice
  • “Lite” coconut milk for Asian curries and soups
  • Canned beans: cannellini beans, great northern beans, chickpeas, black beans, red kidney beans
  • Canned lentils
  • Chunk light tuna and salmon

Grains & Legumes

  • Whole-wheat flour and whole-wheat pastry flour (Store opened packages in the refrigerator or freezer.)
  • All-purpose flour
  • Assorted whole-wheat pastas
  • Brown rice and instant brown rice
  • Pearl barley, quick-cooking barley
  • Rolled oats
  • Whole-wheat couscous
  • Bulgur
  • Dried lentils
  • Yellow cornmeal
  • Plain dry breadcrumbs

Nuts, Seeds & Fruits

  • Walnuts
  • Pecans
  • Almonds
  • Hazelnuts
  • Dry-roasted unsalted peanuts
  • Pine nuts
  • Sesame seeds
  • Natural peanut butter
  • Tahini
  • Assorted dried fruits, such as apricots, prunes, cherries, cranberries, dates, figs, raisins (Store opened packages of nuts and seeds in the refrigerator or freezer.)

Refrigerator Basics

  • Low-fat milk or soymilk
  • Low-fat or nonfat plain yogurt and/or vanilla yogurt
  • Reduced-fat sour cream
  • Good-quality Parmesan cheese and/or Romano cheese
  • Sharp Cheddar cheese
  • Eggs (large). Keep them on hand for fast omelets and frittatas.
  • Orange juice
  • Dry white wine. If you wish, substitute nonalcoholic wine.
  • Water-packed tofu

Freezer Basics

  • Fruit-juice concentrates (orange, apple, pineapple)
  • Frozen vegetables: edamame soy beans, peas, spinach, broccoli, bell pepper and onion mix, corn, chopped onions, small whole onions, uncooked hash browns
  • Frozen berries
  • Italian turkey sausage and sliced prosciutto to flavor fast pasta sauces
  • Low-fat vanilla ice cream or frozen yogurt for impromptu dessert

 

Boosting Testosterone

from here

[ ]  There are several reasons why Men have such low testosterone, and we will go over those, but the most important one is diet. You need to eat fat to produce testosterone. Aim for 30% of your total calories form fat. The standard American Low-fat diet is producing heaps of effeminate males. Every guy I know that is super low in T (you can tell because they are frail, timid, sexless, weak) has a poor diet. They eat low fat, low protein, high carbohydrate diets. [ ]

Steak and eggs – the strong mans favorite meal. High saturated fat in the eggs and zinc in the red meat help produce testosterone.

Liver and onions – Onions contains allicin which helps produce testosterone. Liver contains all kinds of good shit. Warriors of old would often eat the raw liver right out of a fresh kill because it gave them strength. If you don’t like eating liver take some Liver Tabs, one of the only supplements that I spend money on. I love liver tabs, they make me feel strong as an ox in the gym. Jack Lalanne would take up to a hundred a day when he was preparing for his incredible feats of strength and stamina such as towing 70 boats with 70 people on his 70th birthday while handcuffed.

Garlic – Garlic also contains allicin.

Peanuts, Salmon, Coconut oil, olive oil are all rich in good fats.

Cook everything in butter, not margarine.

Eat as naturally as possible. Organic for your fruits and veggies and grass-fed for your red meat if you can afford it.

[ ]  For God’s sake never eat soy! Soy is estrogen enhancing poison. [ ]

Some other tips to help increase Testosterone naturally

Get a good night’s sleep in a cool, dark room. Sleep at night or else you will mess up your circadian rhythm which leads to decreased T.

Lift weights. Heavy compound exercises produces testosterone naturally. Between 4-8 reps per set is a good goal.

Don’t smoke. Inhibits sexual appetite, probably because you’re constantly sucking on a thin, white phallus.

Don’t drink (or limit alcohol consumption) – Alcohol has been proven to lower testosterone.

Have sex. Frequent sex, especially first thing in the morning, increase T levels. I experimented with celibacy for 8 long months and I could just about feel the testosterone leaving my body.

Live stress free. Easier said than done but stress and worry is a huge testosterone killer. A good rule of thumb is if you can’t change it there is no point in worrying about it.

If you’re fat, lose weight. Increased weight leads to higher estrogen levels.

Don’t keep your cell phone in your pocket next to your boys. According to Tim Ferris’ The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman cell phone radiation leads to decreased sperm count and T levels.

Listen to music that pumps you up – Songs that pump you up, pump you up full of testosterone.

Eat your vegetables – Vegetables have been repeatedly demonstrated to raise testosterone and decrease estrogen.