Reaction v. Leadership: Where Does Hedonism Fit

Here’s a blog article worth reading closely.  Is hedonism always so bad?

Maybe if it’s mindless, “impulsive,” or “reactionary.”  Contrast this with independents, who have forged a road ahead, in hopes that their environment would be a product of their will and fortitude.” (Emphasis added.)

“It is very important for the modern man to devise his own plans; to set forth standards; to form his personal outlook concerning the world around him; and to conserve that which is valuable . . .”  (Emphasis added.)

Is this the Way to Redemption?  “To do so is not only to have set oneself away from a reactionary lifestyle, but such creation has defeated the futility of life’s lack of universal meaning.”

But why not forge a road to hedonism, plan hedonism, set standards of hedonism, and form a personal outlook of hedonism, to conserve hedonism.  Does a life of hedonism lack universal meaning?  If society is going down the drain, is it better to fight heroically, or to drown our sorrows in hedonism.

Anyway, a thoughtful short essay.  Excerpt quoted below.  (I even sense something vaguely Buddhist in the first paragraph.)

* * *

“What about the typical worker-student? He goes to work to gain wealth, and he goes to school to achieve higher forms of wealth. He is not concerned with what he learns or how he will apply his knowledge. He is merely doing that which he has been told to do, and expending life for that which he has been promised: acquire a degree, a job, and a bigger bank account. Is it any wonder that such a person spends his weekends partying, watching dull television, and appeasing spontaneous, sexual desires? This person has become enslaved to appeasing himself, despite the fact that he will never be appeased. He has not ascended beyond pleasure-seeking behavior. To him, “status” does not consist of his current state of being, something which he may improve by accomplishing goals that align with his plans and values. He sees status as that which he will achieve after school. There is nothing in the world more important to this person than procuring additional wealth; spending it on an ugly car or two; and retaining a hedonistic lifestyle all the while.

“The caricatures above, and all real-world equivalents, are reactionary: they have formed lifestyles by impulsively reacting to interactions. In truth, all humans must react, but that is not synonymous with living a reactionary lifestyle. Genuine leaders, artists, philosophers, scientists, mathematicians, and architects have long understood that concept. In doing so, they rejected the praxis of reactionaries. They forged a road ahead, in hopes that their environment would be a product of their will and fortitude. Creative spirits do not wish to spiral into the gray, reactionary abyss: they are perfectionists who have goals that which they must achieve. These people are not supported, so they learn to support themselves. Reactionaries, on the other hand, expect to be supported, so they accept only that which panders to their impulse, no matter the effect on them or others.

“It is very important for the modern man to devise his own plans; to set forth standards; to form his personal outlook concerning the world around him; and to conserve that which is valuable, because others will find some manner in choosing the modern man’s lifestyle. In order to abandon the plankton (not to be confused with seclusion or escapism, which is also reactionary), floating about the sea of emptiness, the modern man must create his own life and his own perception. To do so is not only to have set oneself away from a reactionary lifestyle, but such creation has defeated the futility of life’s lack of universal meaning. For it is man’s ingenuity and application of such ingenuity that separates himself from the animals. In this perspective, man has a universal possibility, which is man’s universal value. The creative, achieving person exploits this value, and such a person will forever be set apart from the dull, hollow reactionaries.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s